Tag Archives: galileo

Anything goes? Feyerabend and method

This entry looks at Paul Feyerabend’s reductio ad absurdum of specific rationalist conceptions of scientific method, perhaps one of the least understood arguments in the philosophy of science. I explain the structure of the reductio before considering how Feyerabend applied … Continue reading

Posted in Feyerabend, Galileo, History and Philosophy of Science, History of Science, Philosophy of Science | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Ockham’s Razor

Ockham’s Razor, otherwise called the principle of the economy of thought, is often invoked in debate or arguments, usually to discard or count against one or more theories on the basis that another exists that is simpler or more parsimonious. … Continue reading

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Philosophy in Science

What is philosophy of science? Is it in any way useful? If so, for whom is it useful? Is it at all useful to scientists in their scientific endeavors? Mark Perakh, a physicist, has said, “I dare to claim that … Continue reading

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Instrumentalism in the Galileo Affair

In his unpublished notes from 1615, commenting on Cardinal Bellarmine’s Letter to Foscarini, the Carmelite Father, Galileo wrote as follows: It is of the highest prudence to believe that there is no demonstration of the mobility of the earth until … Continue reading

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The Pope and the Galileo Affair

This entry collects together some remarks about Feyerabend’s comments on the Galileo Affair and their use by Pope Benedict XVI, with minor updates. There had been much discussion of the Galileo Affair following the election of Benedict because the then … Continue reading

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Refusing to look through Galileo’s telescope

There is a famous reference in the so-called Galileo affair to various people refusing to look through Galileo’s telescope at the sunspots and other phenomena he wished to show them. The best known is Cesare Cremonini and I did some … Continue reading

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